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Friday, January 20
 

10:00am

Check-in and Announcements
Friday January 20, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Event Cafe L103

10:00am

Digital Self-Defense in the Time of Trump

Fam, things are about to get real hard. Harder than they have ever been and we need to hold fast and be smart about how we organize over the next four years.

To protect ourselves we need to talk about digital security and how to practice digital self-defense during a time of unprecedented surveillance of our communities. This training is brought to you by EQUALITY LABS, a South Asian Women’s Gender Non Conforming,and Trans Tech Collective.

This is a security self defense training for your digital movement:

* Secure your phone and computer.

* Secure your network access.

* Secure your data.

* Secure your communications.


Speakers
avatar for Tara Adiseshan

Tara Adiseshan

Equality Labs
Tara is programmer, designer, and digital security trainer who works with Equality Labs. Equality Labs is a South Asian American Human Rights Start-up working at the intersection of story, art, and security. They support movements dealing with intractable systems of oppression through a collaborative model that connects multiple disciplines and platforms to maximize potential for change and engender workable, community driven solutions to the... Read More →
SH

Sharmin Hossain

Sharmin Hossain is a Jackson Heights, Queens bred queer Bangladeshi hard femme henna tattoo artist and political educator. As the Director of the Bangladeshi Historical Memory Project, Sharmin has cultivated a liberatory initiative documenting the extensive history of Bangladeshi people through political theatre and digital archiving. For the past five years, Sharmin has been on the core organizing team of East Coast Solidarity Summer, a... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room 304

10:30am

Hacking Capitalism: Divesting, Debt & (more) Ethical Money Management
In Hacking Capitalism, we take the concept of workaround from hacking + anti-capitalist values to motivate and instruct us on how to move past freezing and fear into positive action around our money.

Dealing with money realities that don't match our ethics (banking with Wells Fargo? Citibank?...) or fallout from personal economic hardship (behind on debt, bad credit) takes energy from our lives - energy which could be used MUCH better in movements, activism, or self-care.

You'll get specific resources on how to divest into banks that are more ethical, deal with debt, and think about your finances from a holistic, movement-inclusive perspective. We'll talk about class, white privilege, intersectionality and feminism to ground our work in the wisdom of marginalization.

Navigating social and economic systems that create the complex and often unfriendly world of finance, credit, and debt often equals finding your way around impediments. You don't have to like "the system" to navigate it well! As a matter of fact, those of us who are not "insiders" of systems are often great at navigating them -- we've had to figure out how, which is an advantage.

Given the toxic nature of these interactions, it can seem temporarily better to avoiddealing with personal finance -- but as those of us who've avoided know, it catches up with you. Start Hacking Capitalism and ease your finances today!

Speakers
HD

Hadassah Damien

This class is given by Hadassah Damien, a Brooklyn-based artist, activist, small-business owner, and creator of the Ride Free Fearless Money and Let's Talk About Money series and classes. ridefreefearlessmoney.com


Friday January 20, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 312

10:30am

Theatre of the Oppressed: Organizing On-Stage and Off
Play essential games from the arsenal of Theatre of the Oppressed and participate in a forum theatre demonstration. Connect the tools of Theatre of the Oppressed to human rights and oppression as it affects your community through dialogue and brainstorming.

Speakers
MN

Maaji Newbold

Theatre of the Oppressed NYC facilitator.


Friday January 20, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 300

10:30am

How to Organize 1-on-1
What black freedom organizer Ella Baker called “spade work” entails the often painstaking, but deeply impactful task of speaking with just one person or just a few people at a time, to hear their grievances or motivations and persuade them to join a movement. Doing this effectively isn’t self-explanatory, but it isn’t difficult either. Part 1 of this workshop will frame how to use storytelling and relationship-building as part of a strategic method to build membership/participation in your group or movement, and support for it. In Part 2, you’ll apply this framework in practice 1-on-1 organizing meetings.

Speakers
MC

Max Cohen

Max Cohen is a second year American Studies PhD student at NYU and rank-and-file member of the Crown Heights Tenant Union and GSOC-UAW Local 2110. He has organized for racial and economic justice movements for the last 6 years – principally for Strike Debt, US immigration reform, Brooklyn tenant unionization, and UPenn dining worker unionization. While managing and organizing a campaign for federal comprehensive immigration reform in... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 205

10:30am

Film Screenings
  • 10:30am James Baldwin's "Progress" 
  • 11:00am The 1968 East LA Walkouts
  • 11:30am The Young Lords Doc, "Palante Siempre Palante"
  • 12:30pm Iconoclast: Dave Chappelle + Maya Angelou 
  • 1:30pm Screaming Queens - LGBTQ History of The Riot of Compton's Cafeteria 
  • 2:30pm Julie Dash Interview Octavia Butler 

Friday January 20, 2017 10:30am - 2:30pm
Room L104

11:45am

Tenant's Rights in the Age of Trump
Prepare yourself for a landlord-in-chief by learning your rights as a tenant. The tenants of New York City have been fighting Trump since the 80s. Learn how to fight back and stay in your apartment.

Speakers
AS

Andrea Shapiro

Andrea Shapiro is the program coordinator at Met Council on Housing and an LMSW .


Friday January 20, 2017 11:45am - 12:45pm
Room 312

11:45am

Snapshots of Activism at the New School
In this session, we'll look at a number of documents available online related to histories of protest and activism at the New School, and then discuss issues around documenting current activism.

Speakers
avatar for Liza Harrell-Edge

Liza Harrell-Edge

The New School Archives and Special Collections
Liza has worked in the New School Archives for five years.



Friday January 20, 2017 11:45am - 12:45pm
Room 403

11:45am

What Makes a Village
This session introduces explores what makes a village and explores the individual’s relationship to their community by cultivating creative methods of communication between citizens and public servants.

Speakers
TB

Thomas Bosket

Thomas Bosket studied painting at Parsons School of Design and received his M.F.A. from Yale University in 1995. As an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of General Studio and Graphic Design in the AAS program at Parsons School of Design he has developed the Color Theory and Drawing curricula toward a more socially oriented education model. Thomas is showing his paintings nationally at various galleries and arts organizations, including the ISEA... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 11:45am - 12:45pm
Room 404

12:00pm

Humane Education and Effective Animal Activism
This session is a presentation on modern animal agriculture and its effects on the environment, animals, and human health.

Speakers
CF

Clare Farrow

Clare Farrow has a degree in Psychology (behavior change, perception, attitude, social norms, etc.) and has been an animal activist for years. She is now the NYC Grassroots Director for The Humane League, an international farm animal protection organization.


Friday January 20, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 300

12:15pm

Where Do We Go From Here? Deepening Our Understanding of Race in a Collective Future
Riffing off of MLK's last book (Where do we go from here?), I will reintroduce the "race" concept from a historical and socio-spatial perspective, and then move towards several concrete ways communities currently labor to reimagine difference without separability: a common, interdependent future.

Speakers

Friday January 20, 2017 12:15pm - 1:00pm
Room 205

12:30pm

Teaching Humanities to Underserved Populations
Professor van Zuylen will speak about the bringing humanities education to underserved populations from her experience directly the national Clemente Course in the Humanities. 

The Clemente Course in the Humanities® is a unique educational institution founded in 1995 to teach the humanities at the college level to people living in economic distress.

The course works in conjunction with faculty from leading colleges and universities on five continents. Students learn through dialogue about moral philosophy, literature, history, art history, critical thinking, and writing.

More than ten thousand students worldwide have attended a Clemente course, and over fifty percent have successfully completed it.

The aim of the course is to bring the clarity and beauty of the humanities to people who have been deprived of these riches through economic, social, or political forces. While the course is not intended as preparation for college, many students have gone on to two- and four-year colleges. 


Speakers
MV

Marina van Zuylen

Professor of French and Comparative Literature, Bard College | Academic Director, Bard Clemente Course in the Humanities | | She is a professor of French and Comparative Literature and a great supporter of the Clemente Courses. She has taught literature in Poughkeepsie, NY and philosophy in Dorchester, MA. She also serves as Academic Director for a number of Clemente sites that get credit through Bard College.


Friday January 20, 2017 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Room 312

1:00pm

Lunch I
Friday January 20, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Baldwin Rivera Boggs Social Justice Hub

1:00pm

Lunch II
Friday January 20, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Baldwin Rivera Boggs Social Justice Hub

1:00pm

The Confined Arts Exhibit

The Confined Arts (TCA) is a platform to illustrate and showcase the talents and creative voices of currently and formerly incarcerated artists. This platform provides an outlet for artists to express their voice through the visual and performing arts, poetry, and music as a means to abolish the inhumane narratives and socially degrading stigmas that are used to describe the past experiences and limit the futures of individuals impacted by incarceration. The TCA platform is also open to those artists who work in or around jails and prisons, as well as those who have been impacted by mass incarceration through a friend or family member.

Changing Perceptions: The need for a new narrative: There is a tremendous need to change the perceptions of men and women who are stigmatized and dehumanized because of their past experiences of justice involvement. Having endured the prison system himself, Isaac Scott founded The Confined Arts as a platform and outlet for men and women to use art as a medium to share their narrative, break through new perspectives, and shift perceptions of those affected by mass incarceration. Equally important is the healing power through the arts to not only change the audience perspective but to also change the artist as well. TCA will open dialogue between community member, activist, advocates and elected officials to encourage and motivate justice system reform in the areas of collateral consequences and the restoration of civil liberties such as voting rights.

Public Education: What they don’t know: By sharing unheard narratives of those impacted by incarceration through the visual and performing arts, The Confined Arts offers spaces for public education to shatter misconceptions about people involved in the justice system, including perceptions such as untrustworthiness and irredeemability.


Speakers
avatar for Isaac Scott

Isaac Scott

Arts & Communication, Columbia University
Isaac Scott is a mixed-media fine artist and activist. He is currently the Social Relations Lab Technician and Communications Specialist at the Center for Justice at Columbia University, teaching young adults graphic design while managing the center’s public outreach. His passion as an advocate for justice reform runs deep, as he is directly affected by the justice system and its disenfranchising nature. Today Isaac is a leader in promoting... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Baldwin Rivera Boggs Social Justice Hub

1:15pm

Creating a Healing Space through Mindfulness and Meditation and the Greater Spiritual Purpose of Dark Times
Spend one hour learning mindfulness and meditation techniques to lift us out of the darkness of these times. Yet, while lifting ourselves up, it is equally important to remain grounded in the reality of trauma on a personal, nationwide, and worldwide scale. By learning to focus on ourselves with specific exercises that lead us into our emotional life, we will explore simple and safe techniques to create deeper self awareness and acceptance. Looking at inner power dynamics through journaling, and looking at the psychology of the outer hierarchic societal structure, we will focus on what we can do, so as never to feel helpless again.

Speakers
AL

Anneke Lucas

Anneke Lucas founded Liberation Prison Yoga in 2014 and serves as its Executive Director. As a survivor of child sex trafficking and extreme violence, she used elements of her own healing journey to develop programs, based on how she would have wished to be treated in her young adult life. Anneke is a public speaker and leads workshops on trauma for yoga teachers, prison staff, mental health care providers, and the... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Room 205

2:00pm

Know Your RIghts: Digital Privacy in the 21st Century
This interactive workshop for students and community members focuses on how existing privacy laws apply to New Yorkers in the digital age. All of us rely on our cell phones and the internet to connect, communicate, work, manage our finances and research information, including on sensitive topics such as politics and health care. But law enforcement is increasingly taking advantage of New York’s outdated privacy laws to turn your cell phones into tracking devices and access your sensitive digital information without proper oversight.

Speakers
NB

Noah Breslau

Noah Breslau is a Legal Investigator with the NYCLU.
MS

Michael Sisitzky

Michael Sisitzky is a policy counsel in the Advocacy Department of the New York Civil Liberties Union. He leads the department’s police transparency and accountability campaign, and his portfolio also includes work in the area of privacy and technology. Michael graduated from New York University with a B.A. in politics, and he received his law degree from the Georgetown University Law Center in 2012. In 2014, he was recognized by the National... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room 300

2:00pm

Reversing the School to Prison Pipeline in the face of a Trump Presidency
This workshop will provide an overview of some of the educational and legal policies that have had a devastating and disproportionate impact on low income communities of color and led to higher occurrences of functional illiteracy, suspension and expulsion rates, drop out and force out rates and subsequent incarceration. It will review some educational and legal policy changes that occurred in the Age of Obama and begin to brainstorm possible shifts that might occur under a Trump administration. It will ultimately develop actionable steps for collaborating across sector in order to support and be allies toward low income students of color who are struggling to achieve educational and career goals over the next four years and beyond.

Speakers
BL

Brian Lewis

Brian Lewis is currently a Senior Teacher and Manger of Education with exalt, an organization whose mission is to reverse the School-to-Prison Pipeline and elevate expectations for 15-19 year olds who are currently or have been involved with the criminal justice system. He has worked at exalt for the past 2 years. He has also taught various courses at the New School on Mass Incarceration and Critical Pedagogy.


Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room 304

2:00pm

White Man Teaching: Confronting Race in a Segregated School System
This workshop is about how, as a white male educator who was raised in a middle class family, I approach teaching classes that are made up almost entirely of low income students from African American and Latino backgrounds in NYC. Do I have a place -- or even a right to be -- in the classroom in a community of color? What must I do in order to be an effective ally to my students? How do I de-colonize my classroom practice? How can educators contribute to combating inequality and injustice in meaningful and authentic ways? This is a workshop about the process of opening one's eyes to the realities of race, and about looking beyond that construct toward social justice.

Speakers
JL

Joel Lederer

Joel Lederer teaches at Lower Manhattan Arts Academy/ NYC Public Schools. He has taught in Title I NYC Public high schools for 14 years, and has been societally designated as a white male all of his life.


Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room 205

2:00pm

Boycotts as Act of Engagement
Boycotts or acts of refusal can become opportunities of deep engagement, rather than disengagement, opening new ways of understanding an issue and responding to it in substance. This workshop is inspired by the book Assuming Boycott: Resistance, Agency and Cultural Production, co-edited by Kareem Estefan, Laura Raicovich and Carin Kuoni and forthcoming from OR Books in May 2017.

Speakers
CK

Carin Kuoni

Carin Kuoni is the Director of the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School and Co-editor of book on cultural boycotts and co-editor of book on cultural boycotts.


Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room 404

2:00pm

Readings of Compassion and Resistance: A Community Reading and Open-Mic
We are cultivating a safe and inclusive space to share both original writing and writing by others that inspires, comforts, and guides us during this presidential transition.

Everyone is welcome.

Speakers
JC

Jackie Clark

Jackie Clark is the author of Aphoria (Brooklyn Arts Press) and four chapbooks, most recently Sympathetic Nervous System (Bloof Books). She is the series editor of Song of the Week for Coldfront Magazine and small press editor of Boog City. She is Assistant Director of Faculty Affairs in the Provost Office at The New School.
AG

Alina Gregorian

Alina Gregorian is an Armenian American writer, artist, and curator living in Brooklyn, NY. She is the author of the poetry chapbook Navigational Clouds (Monk Books, 2015), and recently finished a project where she created a GIF for each letter of the Armenian alphabet. Since 2012, she has curated Triptych Readings, which has hosted events at spaces like envoy enterprises, Fig. 19, Body Actualized Center, Babycastles, and its current home... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Event Cafe L103

2:00pm

Writing the Self: Our Stories, Healing and Magic for Change
Incorporate storytelling as a powerful way of healing and advocating for wellness.

Speakers

Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 312

2:00pm

Active Listening

While we fight identity-based inequalities by trying to make systemic change, we also need to bring anti-oppression principles into daily interactions. How can we actively communicate abstract ideas like “respect” or “openness”? At this workshop, you'll learn concrete verbal and non-verbal techniques that work immediately to address power differentials within groups and improve one-on-one communication. Whether you are a teacher, student, or activist, you’ll learn how to improve your effectiveness by communicating to others that you value them as human beings, a central task of building strong relationships and equitable communities.



Speakers
avatar for Pippi Kessler

Pippi Kessler

Consultant and Speaker, Pippi Kessler Consulting
Consultant and speaker Pippi Kessler has trained thousands of people across the country to use their power for good. As the Education Director at ImmerseNYC and as an ongoing consultant and former Program Director at Ma'yan, she designs feminist leadership programs for teens, conducts professional training seminars, and creates innovative curricula and workshops. She is also the Director of Rowe Young People’s Camp, a summer program for... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 403

3:00pm

Self Care and Radical Openness
This session will hold space for collectively defining what counter-hegemonic self-care looks like. We will refer to women of color feminist writing as our starting points for this discussion, including "Choosing the Margin as a Space of Radical Openness" (bell hooks, Yearning, 1990), Audre Lorde's assertion that caring for ourselves is "not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare." Together, we will share practices for care and dream up new approaches that affirm the political act of sustaining ourselves and each other, especially those whose lives are deeply impacted by interpersonal, institutional, and systemic violence.

Speakers
avatar for Kendra Danowski

Kendra Danowski

Kendra Danowski (pronouns: she/her) joined Lang’s Office of Civic Engagement & Social Justice (CESJ) in January 2015. She designs and facilitates programs for Lang students centered on social justice theory and activism, supports equitable institutional change at the university, and collaborates with community partner organizations across New York. Among other CESJ programs, Kendra co-manages the Gural Scholars Program, Summer Student... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Room 601

3:00pm

Know Your Rights: What to Do If You’re Stopped By the Police
This training covers civilian-police interactions on the street, in your car and in your home. The training focuses on Fourth Amendment rights in relation to searches and seizures, and provides practical advice for getting through a police encounter safely and calmly, with your rights fully intact. Each training participant will receive a What To Do If You’re Stopped By the Police palm card.

Speakers
NB

Noah Breslau

Noah Breslau is a Legal Investigator with the NYCLU.
MS

Michael Sisitzky

Michael Sisitzky is a policy counsel in the Advocacy Department of the New York Civil Liberties Union. He leads the department’s police transparency and accountability campaign, and his portfolio also includes work in the area of privacy and technology. Michael graduated from New York University with a B.A. in politics, and he received his law degree from the Georgetown University Law Center in 2012. In 2014, he was recognized by the National... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 300

3:00pm

"Concert for America" Livestreaming
Friday January 20, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Room L104

3:15pm

The Lyric in Crisis
Matthew Sandler will talk about two moments of iconic protest against Trump during the campaign-- Johari Osayi Idusuyi reading Claudia Rankine’s Citizen at Trump rally in Springfield, Il (11/9/15) or the spontaneous chanting of Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright” by protesters on the floor of the University of Illinois, Chicago Pavilion (3/11/16). He will draw a comparison between these scenes and the role of the lyric in other historical crises, especially in the abolition movement and the Civil War era. This talk will address the politics of culture.

Speakers
MS

Matthew Sandler

Matt Sandler directs the MA program in American Studies at the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia. He has work in Callaloo, African American Review, Comparative Literature, and the LA Review of Books. He is writing a book tentatively entitled "Black Romanticism: Early African American Poetry and the Spirit of the Age."



Friday January 20, 2017 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Room 304

3:15pm

Islamophobia: Impact and Implications
New York City is home to one of the largest and most diverse Muslim communities in the United States as well as the soon- to- be President who campaigned on a platform of bigotry and fear-mongering. "Islamophobia: Impact and Implications" will address the impact of Islamophobia in the current social and political climate, grassroots efforts to help the Muslim community cope and respond to threats to civil rights and liberties, and the importance of building inclusive social justice movements beyond lines of difference. The session will end with steps for concrete action and building effective allyship.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Tasca

Christina Tasca

Executive Director, Muslim Community Network
Christina Tasca is the Executive Director of the Muslim Community Network where she leads the organization in identifying and cultivating the leadership skills of all Americans to fully participate in the social landscape. She is also a Faith and Social Justice Fellow with the FPWA focusing on the role of faith leaders in social justice movements and community organizing, and sits on the Advisory Board of the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Room 205

3:30pm

Staying Engaged: Political Consumerism and Activism
The President-Elect's agenda includes a number of issues that are properly termed 'deal-breakers' and with regard to these issues there can be no coming together. This session will begin with brief commentary on why this time calls for sustained action, provide some background on contemporary consumer advocacy and boycotts, and end with some examples of how those who are disturbed by the President-Elect's agenda have begun to take action.

Speakers
CD

Cedric Dawkins

Cedric Dawkins is an Associate Professor of Business Ethics at Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia. His research interests are in the broad area of corporate social responsibility and include connections between labour rights and human rights, labour union revitalization, and the impact of disclosure on corporate behaviour. He is an associate editor for Business Ethics: A European Review.



Friday January 20, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 403

3:30pm

Visioning for Black Lives Under Trump
In August 2016, over 50 organizations launched the Vision 4 Black Lives, a set of policy demands for a radical realignment of power needed to achieve Black dignity and freedom. Three months later, Trump and Republicans swept national elections and are poised to usher in dramatically different organizing conditions at the national level. Come prepared to share your thoughts on what this past election means for realizing the Vision for Black Lives, and consequently, all our movements.

Speakers
avatar for Karl Kumodzi

Karl Kumodzi

Born in Togo, and raised in Las Vegas, NV, Karl Kumodzi is a Black abolitionist, movement organizer, and trainer with Blackbird and BYP100. He holds a BA in History from Stanford University, and currently resides in Brooklyn, NY. Karl is on the M4BL Policy Table leadership team, which led the creation of the Vision for Black Lives.



Friday January 20, 2017 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 312

4:00pm

Resistance Through Writing
Resistance Through Writing is focused on producing creative writing as a form of political protest. Participants will engage in a community discussion on the role of writing in times of resistance, reading excerpts from writers like Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, and more. The goal of the session is to provide participants with the tools and resources to write and share their own works of political protest in the genres of poetry and/or nonfiction. Every participant will leave the session with at least a partial first draft of a piece of writing on a topic related to the election. 

Speakers
avatar for Kristi DiLallo

Kristi DiLallo

Kristi DiLallo is a graduate teaching fellow at Columbia University's School of the Arts, where she is currently teaching a nonfiction creative writing course while writing her own work of nonfiction on her personal-yet-political experience of living with the stigma around children of incarcerated parents. She has facilitated many writing workshops in mental health facilities, traditional classrooms at the middle school, high school, and... Read More →
NX

Nathan Xavier Osorio

Nathan Xavier Osorio is a poet and recent graduate from Columbia's MFA program. In light of the inauguration, his poetry about his experience as the child of Mexican and Nicaraguan immigrants will be featured in an upcoming anthology titled "Poems for Political Disaster" published by the Boston Review, which features a variety of poems in response to the election. Nathan has extensive experience facilitating writing workshops at various levels of... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 304

4:30pm

"Century's Container" - short film

The video Century’s Container includes excerpts of texts by Judith Butler, Toby Rollo, Mona Saeed Kamal, Hari Kunzru, and Sham-e-Ali Nayeem, and was produced for the public forum “Sense of Emergency,” organized in December 2016 by Andrew Weiner at NYU. It was screened at Parliament of Bodies in Athens in January.

The "Muslim" is this century’s container for the Other; but the definition of the Other is also always changing, while the expulsion impulse remains a constant—just ask Polish Jews, Iraqi Kurds, Bengali Hindus, Turkish Armenians, or Japanese Americans. The same year that we experienced an intense backlash in North America and Europe, the Bangladesh government pushed Rohingya refugees (also "Muslim") back into Myanmar and toward escalating violence, under the eyes of Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi.

 


Speakers
avatar for Naeem Mohaiemen

Naeem Mohaiemen

Naeem Mohaiemen researches the tragic past of actually existing socialism, and the unwritten futures of an as-yet unborn global left, in opposition to sectarian unities of race and religion.


Friday January 20, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room L104

4:30pm

Beyond Beautifying: Using Design to Envision and Transform Our Futures
In this session, participants will think critically about the "design for good" landscape and unpack the forces that impact and perpetuate systems of oppression. By introducing a series of readings and precedents, participants will begin to consider design's transformative capabilities and imagine futures outside of existing structures. To close the session, participants will brainstorm practical ways to apply tenets of justice and anti-oppression to their creative practices and share resources.

Speakers
JR

Joelle Riffle

Joelle Riffle is a graphic designer based in New York, developing bright and powerful visual languages. She runs an online visual journal called aslittlefear.co.


Friday January 20, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 205

4:45pm

Lobbying 101: Everything You Need to Know About Lobbying for Social Justice
This training covers techniques and strategies for effective legislative advocacy with elected officials or policymakers at any level. Participants will learn how to prepare for a lobby visit with an elected official, best tools for framing an argument, how to translate a lobby visit into legislative action, and how to follow-up after a lobby visit to ensure productive results. 

Speakers
NB

Noah Breslau

Noah Breslau is a Legal Investigator with the NYCLU.
MS

Michael Sisitzky

Michael Sisitzky is a policy counsel in the Advocacy Department of the New York Civil Liberties Union. He leads the department’s police transparency and accountability campaign, and his portfolio also includes work in the area of privacy and technology. Michael graduated from New York University with a B.A. in politics, and he received his law degree from the Georgetown University Law Center in 2012. In 2014, he was recognized by the National... Read More →



Friday January 20, 2017 4:45pm - 5:30pm
Room 300

5:30pm

Closing Program Featuring Performance
The closing program will feature Messiah Ramkissoon, artist and activist, who will share some spoken word pieces that speak to the moment. 

Speakers
MR

Messiah Ramkissoon

Trinidad-born, New York-based emcee MESSIAH has a message: words possess power. His own power was uncovered at the tender age of four, when he was encouraged to write and perform poetry by a second mother who once joined Bob Marley’s musicians and Olu Dara onstage. | | From a household full of music and spirituality, to struggles with the U.S. immigration and justice systems, Messiah’s early journey culminated with recognition as Youth of... Read More →


Friday January 20, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Event Cafe L103